AstraZeneca’s Lynparza granted FDA priority review for PROpel

AstraZeneca

AstraZeneca plc (LON:AZN) supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for Lynparza (olaparib) in combination with abiraterone and prednisone or prednisolone has been accepted and granted Priority Review in the US for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

Lynparza is being jointly developed and commercialised by AstraZeneca and MSD.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) grants Priority Review to applications for medicines that offer significant advantages over available options by demonstrating safety or efficacy improvements, preventing serious conditions, or enhancing patient compliance.1 The Prescription Drug User Fee Act date, the FDA action date for their regulatory decision, is anticipated during the fourth quarter of 2022.

In the US, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in male patients and is projected to cause approximately 35,000 deaths in 2022.2 Overall survival for patients with mCRPC is approximately three years in clinical trial settings, and even shorter in the real world.3-6 Approximately half of patients with mCRPC may receive only one line of active treatment, with diminishing benefit of subsequent therapies.6-11

Susan Galbraith, Executive Vice President, Oncology R&D, AstraZeneca, said: “There remains a critical unmet need among patients diagnosed with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, where the prognosis remains poor and treatment options are limited. Today’s news is another step towards bringing forward a new, much-needed treatment option in this setting. If approved, Lynparza with abiraterone will become the first combination of a PARP inhibitor and a new hormonal agent for patients with this disease.”

Dr. Eliav Barr, Senior Vice President, Head of Global Clinical Development and Chief Medical Officer, MSD Research Laboratories, said: “MSD is committed to developing new treatment options for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, a complex disease that urgently needs more therapies. We look forward to working with the FDA towards the goal of bringing a new option to patients with mCRPC with or without HRR gene mutations.”

The sNDA was based on results from the PROpel Phase III trial presented at the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium and later published in NEJM Evidence.

These results showed Lynparza in combination with abiraterone reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 34% versus abiraterone alone (based on a hazard ratio [HR] of 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54-0.81; p<0.0001). Median radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) was 24.8 months for Lynparza plus abiraterone versus 16.6 for abiraterone alone. The safety and tolerability of Lynparza in combination with abiraterone was in line with that observed in prior clinical trials and the known profiles of the individual medicines.12

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Lynparza is approved in the US for patients with HRR gene-mutated mCRPC (BRCA-mutated and other HRR gene mutations) who have progressed following prior treatment with enzalutamide or abiraterone; and in the EU, Japan and China for patients with BRCA-mutated mCRPC who have progressed following prior therapy that included a new hormonal agent (NHA). These approvals were based on the data from the PROfound Phase III trial.

AstraZeneca and MSD strategic oncology collaboration

In July 2017, AstraZeneca and Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, US, known as MSD outside the US and Canada, announced a global strategic oncology collaboration to co-develop and co-commercialise Lynparza, the world’s first PARP inhibitor, and Koselugo (selumetinib), a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitor, for multiple cancer types.

Working together, the companies will develop Lynparza and Koselugo and other potential new medicines as monotherapies. The companies will also develop Lynparza and Koselugo in combination with their respective PD-L1 and PD-1 medicines independently.

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